Asian American Readings:

Taken from a syllabus for a course in Gender and Generation in Asian American Diaspora studies


*Espiritu, Yen Le. 2003. Chapter 7, “ ‘We Don’t Sleep Around Like White Girls Do’: The Politics of Home and Location,” in Home Bound: Filipino American Lives Across Cultures, Communities, and Counties. Berkeley: University of California Press.


*Espiritu, Yen Le. 2003. Chapter 6, “Home, Sweet Home: Work and Changing Family Relations,” in Home Bound: Filipino American Lives Across Cultures, Communities, and Counties. Berkeley: University of California Press.

*Kibria, Nazli. 1993. Chapter 5, “The Family Tightrope: Gender Relations.” Pp. 108-143, in Family Tight Rope: The Changing Lives of Vietnamese Americans, Princeton: Princeton University Press.

*Zhou, Min. 2004. Chapter 2. “Coming of Age at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century: A Demographic Profile of Asian American Youth.” Pp. 34-50 in Jennifer Lee and Min Zhou (eds.). Asian American Youth: Culture, Identity, and Ethnicity. New York: Routledge.

*Kibria, Nazli. 2002. Chapter 5, “The Model Minority at Work.” Becoming Asian American: Second-Generation Chinese and Korean American Identities. 

* Kibria, Nazli. 2002. Chapter 6, “Ethnic Futures: Children and Intermarriage,” Becoming Asian American: Second-Generation Chinese and Korean American Identities.

*Min Zhou & Yang Sao Xiong. 2005.“The multifaceted American experiences of the children of Asian immigrants: Lessons for segmented assimilation.” Ethnic and Racial Studies, Volume 28, Issue 6: 1119-1152. (Print will be available on bSpace.)

Kibria, Nazli. 2002. Chapter 1, “Asian Americans and the Puzzle of New Immigrant Integration.” Becoming Asian American: Second-Generation Chinese and Korean American Identities. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press. (All chapters of the book available through EBRARY)

*Kibria, Nazli. 2002. Chapter 2, “Growing up Chinese and America, Korean and American.” Becoming Asian American: Second-Generation Chinese and Korean American Identities. 

*Kibria, Nazli. 2002. Chapter 3, “The Everyday Consequences of Being Asian: Ethnic Options and Ethnic Binds.” Becoming Asian American: Second-Generation Chinese and Korean American Identities. 

*Kibria, Nazli. 2002. Chapter 4, “College and Asian American Identity.” Becoming Asian American: Second-Generation Chinese and Korean American Identities.

Resegregation in the American South
iowaarchaeology:

"Corn Farmers and Effigy Mound Builders: Iowa 1000 Years Ago" — Just one of our Discovery Trunks!
http://discover.research.uiowa.edu/corn-farmers-and-effigy-mound-builders-iowa-1000-years-ago
Did you know that our Discovery Trunks are available to educators across Iowa?  Because of recent grants, there is now NO CHARGE for checking them out! 
You can browse the trunks on the Dare to Discover website and reserve them using the online form.

iowaarchaeology:

"Corn Farmers and Effigy Mound Builders: Iowa 1000 Years Ago" — Just one of our Discovery Trunks!

http://discover.research.uiowa.edu/corn-farmers-and-effigy-mound-builders-iowa-1000-years-ago

Did you know that our Discovery Trunks are available to educators across Iowa?  Because of recent grants, there is now NO CHARGE for checking them out! 

You can browse the trunks on the Dare to Discover website and reserve them using the online form.

thecivilwarparlor:

A HERO HISTORY FORGOT
FILIPINO SOLDIER SERVED IN THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR
Cornelius Balderry— He belonged to Company A, 11th Michigan Volunteers
Balderry passed away on August 18, 1895 of tuberculosis at the age of 49.
http://pinoyhistory.proboards.com/thread/8
http://adenu1980.blogspot.com/2011_05_01_archive.html
 

thecivilwarparlor:

A HERO HISTORY FORGOT

FILIPINO SOLDIER SERVED IN THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR

Cornelius Balderry— He belonged to Company A, 11th Michigan Volunteers

Balderry passed away on August 18, 1895 of tuberculosis at the age of 49.

http://pinoyhistory.proboards.com/thread/8

http://adenu1980.blogspot.com/2011_05_01_archive.html

 

thecivilwarparlor:

Little Known Black History Fact: Sweet Potato Pie- Photo: Sweet Potato Pie Recipe By African Slave Abby Fisher in 1881 

During the sixteenth century, Brits from Europe brought the tradition of making pumpkin pies for dessert to West Africa. The tradition was soon brought to America during slavery, where the African slaves transformed the dessert into something sweeter using yams, then sweet potatoes. Coincidentally, yams and black-eyed peas was a common food slaves were fed during the Middle Passage.

The name of the food was inconsistent at first, because the yam and sweet potato come from two different types of plants. The word yam in African dialects was either “Oyame or Yam Yam” or a few other terms with a few other meanings. Yams are monocots from the Dioscorea family. Sweet potatoes are from the Morning Glory plant family.

Sweet potato pie recipes made a cookbook debut in the 18th century. In the late part of the 19th century, Fannie Famer featured a recipe for glazed sweet potatoes in the Boston Cooking School Cookbook. Soon after, inventor George Washington Carver began to find various uses for the sweet potato, including in a candied version. He released over 100 uses for the vegetable.

As the slaves made the pie for large gatherings in celebration and as a part of family meals, the tradition has continued for family gatherings and black family reunions today.

http://blackamericaweb.com/2013/04/10/little-known-black-history-fact-sweet-potato-pie/

todaysdocument:


"Negro sailors of the USS MASON commissioned at Boston Navy Yard 20 March 1944 proudly look over their ship which is first to have predominantly Negro crew."
From the series: General Photographic File of the Department of Navy, 1943 - 1958

The USS Mason was one of only two ships during World War II with predominately African American crews.  The experiences of the USS Mason’s crew would later be dramatized in the film Proud (2004).
More images of the USS Mason and her crew at the U.S. Navy’s History and Heritage site.  

todaysdocument:

"Negro sailors of the USS MASON commissioned at Boston Navy Yard 20 March 1944 proudly look over their ship which is first to have predominantly Negro crew."

From the series: General Photographic File of the Department of Navy, 1943 - 1958

The USS Mason was one of only two ships during World War II with predominately African American crews.  The experiences of the USS Mason’s crew would later be dramatized in the film Proud (2004).

More images of the USS Mason and her crew at the U.S. Navy’s History and Heritage site.  

californiastatelibrary:

In 1850, Nancy (Ross) Gooch (center) was brought to California by her owner, leaving her only son behind in Missouri.  After she was freed by laws prohibiting slavery in California, she was able to buy her son’s (Andrew Monroe) and his wife’s freedom by sewing, cooking, and doing laundry for miners.
Nancy and her family were well respected in the community. They acquired a substantial amount of the land in the Coloma area.  Their land included a successful 320 acre fruit farm as well as the site where Sutter’s saw mill originally stood.

californiastatelibrary:

In 1850, Nancy (Ross) Gooch (center) was brought to California by her owner, leaving her only son behind in Missouri.  After she was freed by laws prohibiting slavery in California, she was able to buy her son’s (Andrew Monroe) and his wife’s freedom by sewing, cooking, and doing laundry for miners.

Nancy and her family were well respected in the community. They acquired a substantial amount of the land in the Coloma area.  Their land included a successful 320 acre fruit farm as well as the site where Sutter’s saw mill originally stood.

Anonymous asked: got any advice for a future hs history teacher on including more content about minorities and women? i'm dreading having to stick to the completely anglo centered content standards >.<

Do some research. 

I’m sure you know how: start with minority centered Academic databases and museums’ education sites. 

coolchicksfromhistory:

oupacademic:


Ethel Martin Bolden’s dream of becoming a librarian came true through an opportunity provided by John Whiteman, a Waverly Elementary administrator, who expressed interest in establishing a school library. This motivated Bolden to take library courses at neighboring Allen University and Benedict College. With her acquired knowledge, she established the first elementary library in an all‐black Richland School District One public school in 1946.

In honor of Black History Month in the United States, we’re recognizing African American librarians like Ethel Martin Bolden. The Oxford African American Studies Center is free for Black History Month. Simply use Username: blackhistorymonth and Password: onlineaccess to login.
Photo Credit: Allen University, Chapelle Administration Building, 1530 Harden Street, Columbia, Richland County, SC. Photo by Van Jones Martin 1980. Library of Congress HABS SC,40-COLUM,10A-1. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons. 

Oupacademic’s has a series of post about black librarians which can be found here.

coolchicksfromhistory:

oupacademic:

Ethel Martin Bolden’s dream of becoming a librarian came true through an opportunity provided by John Whiteman, a Waverly Elementary administrator, who expressed interest in establishing a school library. This motivated Bolden to take library courses at neighboring Allen University and Benedict College. With her acquired knowledge, she established the first elementary library in an all‐black Richland School District One public school in 1946.

In honor of Black History Month in the United States, we’re recognizing African American librarians like Ethel Martin Bolden. The Oxford African American Studies Center is free for Black History Month. Simply use Username: blackhistorymonth and Password: onlineaccess to login.

Photo Credit: Allen University, Chapelle Administration Building, 1530 Harden Street, Columbia, Richland County, SC. Photo by Van Jones Martin 1980. Library of Congress HABS SC,40-COLUM,10A-1. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Oupacademic’s has a series of post about black librarians which can be found here.