African-American and Asian American relations

deejaybunny12:

ushistoryminuswhiteguys:

A close friend asked if I had any possible articles/titles/books to share or suggest on the subject (she was looking for 19th c. American west, but this is a tad bit broader):

Also want to point out to not romanticize POC solidarity, as there were Asian Americans who both united and fought against African Americans before and still now. Specifically, up until the 1960’s, race solidarity usually happened in labor strikes striking for better labor conditions rather than racial equality, otherwise there wasn’t really much unity for racial equality  itself until the 1960’s, where lots of different Asian American groups adopted the framework of the Black Panthers and Black Power Movement for their specific neighborhoods. At least that was what my social movement research was about. But yeah, let’s learn about this stuff, y’all. It’s really interesting and I’m glad researching about intraracial solidarity and conflict is part of my entire undergrad degree.

I’m not sure where you got that this post was about romanticizing POC solidarity from…? A good majority of these sources cover the 19th century and are about race relations whatever they may be. 

Anonymous asked: Unless I'M missing something as well, isn't the Caribbean (geographically speaking) part of the Americas...?

I am assuming their problem is more that this blog is United States History rather than American history. Regardless, I forewarned that the list was broader than simply the USA when I posted it and can only confirm that Cuba is not the US.

For the intents of many historians, Cuba is a part of the Americas/the Atlantic/Caribean, especially when covering slave trade to the new world/Americas. This does not make it the most accurate or precise way to describe it, nor was it my intention to cast US racial descriptions upon Cuban people. I included the book because it gave insight to a broader history as well as a focus on Cuba. 

Anonymous asked: Unless I'm misunderstanding its description, 'The Coolie Speaks: Chinese Indentured Laborers and African Slaves in Cuba' takes place in the Caribbean. Black Cubans are not African Americans; nor are Chinese Cubans Asian American. It can be frustrating, being West Indian, and having American racial categories constantly pushed onto us. Please be more vigilant.

Admittedly yes, although I had included it for my friend because: A.) it was relevant to what she was looking for (both broad and precise research regarding Afro-Asian relations in the 19th century) and B.) Chapter one is entitled “Historical Context of the Coolie Traffic to the Americas”. You could argue that it is not directly United States history (this book’s focus is on Cuba), but the book does also include and discuss the Americas in addition to the Caribbean, as it ties into the greater history of the Atlantic trade. 

I am sorry for the frustrations this may cause. My error was one of translation from a personal bibliographic compiling for a curious friend who wanted absolutely everything to this blog. 

African-American and Asian American relations

A close friend asked if I had any possible articles/titles/books to share or suggest on the subject (she was looking for 19th c. American west, but this is a tad bit broader):

formfollowsfunctionjournal:

Doris “Dorie” Miller was a cook in the US Navy noted for his bravery during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. He was the first African American to be awarded the Navy Cross. A ship’s cook on the battleship West Virginia during Pearl Harbor, Miller was called into action during the attack and fired a Browning .50 caliber anti-aircraft machine gun (a weapon he had received no training on) until it ran out of ammo. Miller was one of the “first heroes of World War II”. He died during the battle of Makin Island when the the escort carrier, Liscome Bay, was sunk by a Japanese submarine. 

formfollowsfunctionjournal:

Doris “Dorie” Miller was a cook in the US Navy noted for his bravery during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. He was the first African American to be awarded the Navy Cross. A ship’s cook on the battleship West Virginia during Pearl Harbor, Miller was called into action during the attack and fired a Browning .50 caliber anti-aircraft machine gun (a weapon he had received no training on) until it ran out of ammo. Miller was one of the “first heroes of World War II”. He died during the battle of Makin Island when the the escort carrier, Liscome Bay, was sunk by a Japanese submarine. 

peashooter85:

The Legend of Stagecoach Mary,
Also known as Mary Fields, Stagecoach Mary was one of the toughest ladies of the Old West.  Born as a slave on a Tennessee plantation in 1832, she gained her freedom after the Civil War and the resulting abolition of slavery.  After the Civil War Mary made her way west where she eventually settled in Cascade County, Montana.
In Montana Mary would gain a reputation as one of the toughest characters in the territory.  Unlike most women of the Victorian Era, Mary had a penchant for whiskey, cheap cigars, and brawling.  It was not uncommon for men to harass her because of her race or her gender.  Those who earned her disfavor did so at their own risk, as the six foot tall two hundred pound woman served up a mean knuckle sandwich.  According to her obituary in Great Falls Examiner “she broke more noses than any other woman in Central Montana”.
In Montana Mary made a living doing heavy labor for a Roman Catholic convent.  She did work such as carpentry, chopping wood, and stone work.  However it was her job of transporting supplies to the convent by wagon that would earn her the name “Stagecoach Mary”.  The job was certainly dangerous, as she braved fierce weather, bandits, robbers, and wild animals.  In one instance her wagon was attacked by wolves, causing the horses to panic and overturn the wagon.  Throughout the night Stagecoach Mary fought off several wolf attacks with a rifle, a ten gauge shotgun, and a pair of revolvers.  
Mary’s job with the convent ended when another hired hand complained it was not fair that she made more money than him to the townspeople and the local bishop. When the bishop dismissed his claims, he went to a local saloon, saying that it was not fair that he should have to work with a black woman (he said something much more obscene). In response, Mary shot him in the bum. The bishop fired Mary, and she was out of a job.
After a failed attempt at running a restaurant, Stagecoach Mary was hired to run freight for the US Postal Service. Today she holds the distinction of being the first African American postal employee. Despite delivering parcels to some of the most remote and rugged areas of Montana, Mary gained a reputation for always delivering on time regardless of the weather or terrain.
At the age of seventy, Stagecoach Mary retired from the parcel business and opened a laundry.  In one incident when a customer refused to pay, the 72 year old woman knocked out one of his teeth.  For the remainder of her life Mary settled down to peace and quiet, drinking whiskey and smoking cheap cigars.  She passed away in 1914 at the age of 82.

peashooter85:

The Legend of Stagecoach Mary,

Also known as Mary Fields, Stagecoach Mary was one of the toughest ladies of the Old West.  Born as a slave on a Tennessee plantation in 1832, she gained her freedom after the Civil War and the resulting abolition of slavery.  After the Civil War Mary made her way west where she eventually settled in Cascade County, Montana.

In Montana Mary would gain a reputation as one of the toughest characters in the territory.  Unlike most women of the Victorian Era, Mary had a penchant for whiskey, cheap cigars, and brawling.  It was not uncommon for men to harass her because of her race or her gender.  Those who earned her disfavor did so at their own risk, as the six foot tall two hundred pound woman served up a mean knuckle sandwich.  According to her obituary in Great Falls Examiner “she broke more noses than any other woman in Central Montana”.

In Montana Mary made a living doing heavy labor for a Roman Catholic convent.  She did work such as carpentry, chopping wood, and stone work.  However it was her job of transporting supplies to the convent by wagon that would earn her the name “Stagecoach Mary”.  The job was certainly dangerous, as she braved fierce weather, bandits, robbers, and wild animals.  In one instance her wagon was attacked by wolves, causing the horses to panic and overturn the wagon.  Throughout the night Stagecoach Mary fought off several wolf attacks with a rifle, a ten gauge shotgun, and a pair of revolvers.  

Mary’s job with the convent ended when another hired hand complained it was not fair that she made more money than him to the townspeople and the local bishop. When the bishop dismissed his claims, he went to a local saloon, saying that it was not fair that he should have to work with a black woman (he said something much more obscene). In response, Mary shot him in the bum. The bishop fired Mary, and she was out of a job.

After a failed attempt at running a restaurant, Stagecoach Mary was hired to run freight for the US Postal Service. Today she holds the distinction of being the first African American postal employee. Despite delivering parcels to some of the most remote and rugged areas of Montana, Mary gained a reputation for always delivering on time regardless of the weather or terrain.

At the age of seventy, Stagecoach Mary retired from the parcel business and opened a laundry.  In one incident when a customer refused to pay, the 72 year old woman knocked out one of his teeth.  For the remainder of her life Mary settled down to peace and quiet, drinking whiskey and smoking cheap cigars.  She passed away in 1914 at the age of 82.

thecivilwarparlor:

Nat Turner’s Rebellion

Enslaved people rose up against slaveholders in Southampton County, Virginia, on August 21, 1831. Led by Nat Turner, rebels moved from plantation to plantation, murdering roughly 55 whites and rallying enslaved people to their cause. They planned to move on to Jerusalem, Virginia, seize supplies, and then make a permanent home in the Great Dismal Swamp. By August 23, the rebels had been defeated. More than 200 black men and women, both enslaved and free, were executed. Nat Turner’s Rebellion alarmed Americans and inflamed the debate over the future of slavery.

Nat Turner’s Bible

It is thought that Nat Turner was holding this Bible when he was captured two months after the rebellion. Turner worked both as an enslaved field hand and as a minister. A man of remarkable intellect, he was widely respected by black and white people in Southampton County, Virginia. He used his talents as a speaker and his mobility as a preacher to organize the slave revolt. This Bible was donated to the museum by descendants of Lavinia Francis, a slaveholder who survived the rebellion. 
National Museum of African American History and Culture, gift of Maurice A. Person and Noah and Brooke Porter

http://americanhistory.si.edu/changing-america-emancipation-proclamation-1863-and-march-washington-1963/1863/resistance

Photo: Nat Turner captured by Mr. Benjamin Phipps, a local farmer-wiki

engineeringhistory:

Happy Birthday Rear Admiral Grace Hopper, computer science pioneer who developed the first compiler and was instrumental in the development of modern programming languages.

engineeringhistory:

Happy Birthday Rear Admiral Grace Hopper, computer science pioneer who developed the first compiler and was instrumental in the development of modern programming languages.

leanin:

Trailblazing Women You May Not Know (But Should): Ellen Ochoa
Each week, the Lean In tumblr will spotlight women who made a lasting mark on the world — yet didn’t always end up in the history books. This week we celebrate Ellen Ochoa, the first Latina astronaut. 
Ellen Ochoa was 11 when Neil Armstrong landed on the moon. Years later, she would become the first Latina to head into space — but she would never have believed that at the time. There were no female astronauts when she was growing up; at the University of San Diego, where she attended college, a professor told her to steer clear of engineering because the classes would be too difficult. "I never considered being an astronaut as an option because when I was growing up there were no female astronauts," she said. 

Read More

leanin:

Trailblazing Women You May Not Know (But Should): Ellen Ochoa

Each week, the Lean In tumblr will spotlight women who made a lasting mark on the world — yet didn’t always end up in the history books. This week we celebrate Ellen Ochoa, the first Latina astronaut. 

Ellen Ochoa was 11 when Neil Armstrong landed on the moon. Years later, she would become the first Latina to head into space — but she would never have believed that at the time. There were no female astronauts when she was growing up; at the University of San Diego, where she attended college, a professor told her to steer clear of engineering because the classes would be too difficult. "I never considered being an astronaut as an option because when I was growing up there were no female astronauts," she said. 

Read More

White gazes, brown breasts: imperial feminism and disciplining desires and bodies in colonial encounters (PDF)
Free access
DOI: 10.1080/00309230.2010.547511 Roland Sintos Colomaa*

pages 243-261

Abstract

This article examines the colonial encounters of gender, race and sexuality in the United States and the Philippines in the early 1900s. It traces the anxieties over US men’s moral degeneracy and the representation of Filipinas as libidinal temptations, which mobilised US women’s active participation in colonial biopolitics and governmentality. It contends that white women as imperial feminists asserted their principled crusade and superiority over white men and brown women by becoming bearers of racialised heteronormative traditions and feminine respectability and becoming barriers to inter‐racial sexual relations. White women focused on the white male domains of military and government and on the colonial education of brown women. Ultimately, the article supplements the Spivakian claim that “white men are saving brown women from brown men”, which has become the quintessential narrative of colonial justification and redemption, with “white women are saving white men and brown women from each other”. Drawing on government, newspaper and school documents, the article engages feminist discussions on the role of women in empire and education.