poetsorg:

from Langston Hughes's Haiti scrapbook

poetsorg:

from Langston Hughes's Haiti scrapbook

Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography of Resistance

Funny story: The other day I was on a plane home and sat beside someone I had an amazing conversation with. I brought up this blog, she brought up her friend’s upcoming book, and having actually seen the pre-order information on amazon, I thought many people would actually be quite interested in pre-ordering this book. It sounds amazing. 

Book Finds — US History Minus White Guys in Maine
Maine’s Visible Black History:  The First Chronicle of Its People
Black men and women have been integral parts of Maine culture and society since the beginning of the colonial era. Indeed, Mainers of African descent served in every American conflict from the King Philip’s War to the present. However, the many contributions of blacks in shaping Maine and the nation have, for a number of reasons, gone largely unacknowledged. Maine’s Visible Black Historynow uncovers and reveals a rich and long-neglected strata of state history and proves a very real connection to regional and national events. Drawing on the excellent writing of contributors Herb Adams, William David Barry, Beverly Dodge Bowens, Stephen Ellis, Leigh Donaldson, Bob Greene, Douglas Hall, Charles L. Lumpkins, Reginald Pitts, Marcia Robinson, Geneva McAuley Sherrer, Helene Ertha Vann, and others, the project covers many facets of history including slavery in Maine (which lasted until 1783), work, religions, family, education, military service, community, social change, arts and science, sports, politics, law, civil rights, underground railroad, and the contributions of individual men and women. There are appendices, resources for students, and an index. The book’s extraordinary illustrations document black life from Aroostook County to York County through the centuries.

Found here.

Book Finds — US History Minus White Guys in Maine

Maine’s Visible Black History:  The First Chronicle of Its People

Black men and women have been integral parts of Maine culture and society since the beginning of the colonial era. Indeed, Mainers of African descent served in every American conflict from the King Philip’s War to the present. However, the many contributions of blacks in shaping Maine and the nation have, for a number of reasons, gone largely unacknowledged. Maine’s Visible Black Historynow uncovers and reveals a rich and long-neglected strata of state history and proves a very real connection to regional and national events. Drawing on the excellent writing of contributors Herb Adams, William David Barry, Beverly Dodge Bowens, Stephen Ellis, Leigh Donaldson, Bob Greene, Douglas Hall, Charles L. Lumpkins, Reginald Pitts, Marcia Robinson, Geneva McAuley Sherrer, Helene Ertha Vann, and others, the project covers many facets of history including slavery in Maine (which lasted until 1783), work, religions, family, education, military service, community, social change, arts and science, sports, politics, law, civil rights, underground railroad, and the contributions of individual men and women. There are appendices, resources for students, and an index. The book’s extraordinary illustrations document black life from Aroostook County to York County through the centuries.

Found here.

We start our Accessing U.S. History journey in Maine, with Mary Pelagie   (1775-1867) also known as Molly Molasses.The picture above is a painting of her daughter Sarah, had with her husband John Neptune, a secondary chief in the Penobscot nation. A Wabanaki native, Mary was was considered a talented medicine woman, and respected elder. 
Read more:
Art about Molly Molasses 
Maine: An Encyclopedia. 
Visit Maine: Native Americans
Penobscot Nation Museum

We start our Accessing U.S. History journey in Maine, with Mary Pelagie   (1775-1867) also known as Molly Molasses.The picture above is a painting of her daughter Sarah, had with her husband John Neptune, a secondary chief in the Penobscot nation. A Wabanaki native, Mary was was considered a talented medicine woman, and respected elder. 

Read more:

Check out my Museums, Art, History, and Pop Culture blog: The Museologist

asianhistory:

I’m shifting to using The Museologist as my main account, and have given it powers as moderator for Asianhistory, and UShistoryminuswhiteguys. It is technically a personal blog of sorts, but obviously is not a private blog. 

To clarify: 

  • themuseologist — Museums, Galleries, Art, History, Pop Culure & more. I will be chronicling my research on Comic Conventions as examples of accessible art programming models, and my curatorial internship.
  • asianhistoryDedicated to the history, people, places, events, and art of the geographical region of Asia.
  • ushistoryminuswhiteguys — A historic blog that focuses on the history of women and minorities in the United States.

Thanks everyone!

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY

I realize that it will cause restless nights sometime. It might cause losing a job; it will cause suffering and sacrifice. It might even cause physical death for some. But if physical death is the price that some must pay to free their children from a permanent life of psychological death, then nothing can be more Christian. Keep going today. Keep moving amid every obstacle. Keep moving amid every mountain of opposition. If you will do that with dignity, when the history books are written in the future, the historians will have to look back and say, ‘There lived a great people. A people with ‘fleecy locks and black complexion,’ but a people who injected new meaning into the veins of civilization; a people which stood up with dignity and honour and saved Western civilization in her darkest hour; a people that gave new integrity and a new dimension of love to our civilization. When that happens, “the morning stars will sing together, and the sons of God will shout for joy.”

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.
PRAYER PILGRIMAGE, 1957

todaysdocument:


Born into slavery in Thomasville, Georgia, on March 21, 1856, Henry Ossian Flipper was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1873. Over the next four years he overcame harassment, isolation, and insults to become West Point’s first African American graduate and the first African American commissioned officer in the regular U.S. Army.


Photograph of Lt. Henry O. Flipper, Photo by Kennedy, ca. 1877; Center for Legislative Archives; Records of the U.S. House of Representatives; National Archives and Records Administration (Reproduced with the permission of the U.S. House of Representatives)

todaysdocument:

Born into slavery in Thomasville, Georgia, on March 21, 1856, Henry Ossian Flipper was appointed to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1873. Over the next four years he overcame harassment, isolation, and insults to become West Point’s first African American graduate and the first African American commissioned officer in the regular U.S. Army.

Photograph of Lt. Henry O. Flipper, Photo by Kennedy, ca. 1877; Center for Legislative Archives; Records of the U.S. House of Representatives; National Archives and Records Administration (Reproduced with the permission of the U.S. House of Representatives)

whitecolonialism:

January 1, 1863: The Emancipation Proclamation Takes Effect.

whitecolonialism:

December 17, 1944: Internment of Japanese-Americans Comes to an End.

On December 17th, 1944 the United States under the direction of U.S. Major General Henry C. Pratt issued Public Proclamation No. 21 stating that on January 2nd, 1945 all Japanese-Americans “evacuees” from the West Coast could return back to their homes.

The internment of Japanese-Americans began exactly ten weeks after the Empire of Japan bombed Pearl Harbor. Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which gave authorization for the removal of any or all people from military areas. As a result the military defined the entire West Coast, home to a majority of Japanese-Americans as military area. Within a couple of months over 110,000 Japanese-Americans were relocated to internment camps built by the US military scattered all over the nation. For the next two years Japanese-Americans would live under dire living conditions and at times abuse from their military guards.

Throughout World War II ten people were found to be spies for the Empire of Japan, not one of them was of Japanese ancestry. Forty-four year would pass until Ronald Reagan and the United States made an official apology to the surviving Japanese-Americans who were relocated, and were given $20,000 tax-free.

South Asians have a complex historical relationship with African Americans. Over time, Desis (South Asians) and Blacks have had multiple crossovers in philosophical, racial, and ethnic identity… As a result of the Civil Rights Movement, the passage of the Immigration and Naturalization Act of 1965 allowed for increased immigration from non-Western nations. The INS act incentivized scientists, professors, physicians, and other professionals to immigrate to the US during the Cold War. Subsequently, it was amended in 1986 so that the families of these immigrants could live as permanent legal residents. The high socioeconomic status of these early waves of immigrants, combined with their ambitions to integrate and prosper into the “the land of opportunity” created the perfect storm for Desis to generate animosity toward Blacks. Although colorism was always endogenously prevalent in South Asia, it was more important to assimilate with prejudices that whites had regarding African Americans in order to create a commonality from which to form an intergroup identity.

…An examination of the 1990 Census found that 90% of Indian-headed households identified as Indian when in 1970 nearly 75% identified as white. The first wave of South Asian immigrants in the 1960s and 1970s were largely educated professionals, and because of their educational background and the facts that immigrants usually avoid association with Blacks, so some identified as white. The latest wave of South Asian immigrants however, has been working-class and more likely to interact with African Americans and other people of color in urban centers.