futurejournalismproject:

Emory Acquires Massive African American Photo Collection

Via Emory:

A rare collection of more than 10,000 photographs depicting African American life from the late 19th and early 20th centuries has been acquired by Emory University’s Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library (MARBL) from photo collector Robert Langmuir of Philadelphia.

The images range from the 1840s – the beginning of photography – to the 1970s, with most of the photos falling in the post-Civil War to pre-World War II era. They include nearly every format, from daguerreotypes to snapshots, and cover a wide range of subject matter. A number of the photos were taken by African American photographers, a topic in itself.

“This collection sparkles with intelligent insights into the lives and cultures of the African American experience over many decades,” says Emory University Provost Earl Lewis, also a professor of history and African American studies. “Its breadth is incredible, its depth is considerable, and its sheer beauty is breathtaking.”

“Scholars from many disciplines will find this collection to be a treasure trove for peering behind the veil and seeing the inner worlds of life in America,” says Lewis. “I am proud that we can add this collection to our library.”

Images: “Young boys with cotton bales”, 1895 (top left). Overseer and sharecroppers, Knoxville, 1910 (top right). Leadbelly with prison officials, Texas, 1915 (bottom).

Select images to enlarge.

thesmithian:


I first of all have to thank a man who brought me into his office—that talks out of the side of his mouth—and he was talking straight…he looked at me and said ‘I’m going to put you on television.’  I said, ‘Yah. OK. Sure. Fine. You call me. I won’t call you.’  I would also like to thank NBC for having GUTS.  I would like to thank Art Stark and Johnny Carson for presenting me each and every night on the ‘Tonight Show.’  I extend my hand to a man by the name of Robert Culp who, well, the guy took…he took a comedian who couldn’t do anything as far as acting is concerned, and he lost this, because he helped me. That’s the greatest thing a human being can ever do.”

—Bill Cosby becomes [on this day in 1966, the] first African-American to receive an Emmy for Best Actor in a dramatic series—for his role in “I Spy.”

thesmithian:

I first of all have to thank a man who brought me into his office—that talks out of the side of his mouth—and he was talking straight…he looked at me and said ‘I’m going to put you on television.’  I said, ‘Yah. OK. Sure. Fine. You call me. I won’t call you.’  I would also like to thank NBC for having GUTS.  I would like to thank Art Stark and Johnny Carson for presenting me each and every night on the ‘Tonight Show.’  I extend my hand to a man by the name of Robert Culp who, well, the guy took…he took a comedian who couldn’t do anything as far as acting is concerned, and he lost this, because he helped me. That’s the greatest thing a human being can ever do.”

Bill Cosby becomes [on this day in 1966, the] first African-American to receive an Emmy for Best Actor in a dramatic series—for his role in “I Spy.”