themuseologist:

The Arizona Latino Arts and Cultural Center is posting a Call to Latina Artists 18 years and older for our 3rd Annual Latina Art Exhibition, 2013. If you, or someone you know is a Latina artist and interested in showing pieces that explore the views and lives of Latina women by Latina women, please be sure to pass this along! The application deadline is April 17th at Midnight (Arizona Time). 

If you have any further questions, please contact the Curators:

Gina Azima - ginaazima@live.com (480) 466-9101 
Jose Andres Giron - joseandresgiron@gmail.com (602)-300-2752

I thought I might Signal Boost this here. Please pass it on!

riversidearchives:

During World War II, Latinas were contributors to the war effort, these Rosies worked in manufacturing along side women from across the American homefront. We found a record of Mina Mendoza, a young woman born in Hermosillo, Mexico.  She made her way to the United States with her family in 1927, crossing the border on foot at Douglas, Arizona.  When the war started, Mina, 5’ 1” and 114 lbs, she was operating a milling machine in the Los Angeles area. Ms. Mendoza became a U.S. citizen in 1944.

In the holdings of the National Archives at Riverside, men and women of Hispanic heritage are intertwined in many of our records, including records documenting citizenship.

¡Celebración de la Herencia Hispana!

To pay tribute to the many generations of Hispanic Americans that have enriched our nation’s history, the National Archives at Riverside will be highlighting some of our holdings relating to Hispanic American history in our region (Southern California, Arizona, and Clark County, NV), including records relating to Private Land Claims, Immigration and Naturalization, military service and many more. 

For more information about Hispanic Heritage Month, see  http://hispanicheritagemonth.gov/

ofanotherfashion:

The Daily News titled this photograph “Mexican American Female Gang” when it ran the photo in 1942 but the systematic criminalization of Mexicans in the 1940s as a justification for racially-motivated attacks (especially directed at zoot suiters) makes me a little wary of the title. In any case, these women seem so utterly cool to me. They’ve been arrested and are sitting in a police station when this photo was taken but look at the nonchalant, almost bored, expression of Frances Silva on the upper left and the raised defiant chin of Josephine Gonzales on the bottom left, as well as the cavalier pose of Lorena Encina on the bottom right in her baggy zoot suit pants and perfect hair. The other two women on the bench are Juanita Gonzales and D. Barrios. These sister-friends (consider the protective gesture of Encina’s elbow on Barrios’ leg) are such badasses, all of them.

sinidentidades:

Brown Berets. 
Sacramento, California. 1971. 

sinidentidades:

Brown Berets. 

Sacramento, California. 1971. 

ofanotherfashion:

This is my grandmother, Dominga Villegas (in the foreground) and “Mama Piedad” (in the background). I am not sure how/if they’re related. One of the houses behind them is the home that my father was born in, in Weslaco Texas. There was no running water, no electricity and they had a pump and an outhouse in the backyard. According to my father, the street was a dirt road back then and the Mexicans lived on one side of town and white people lived on the other side. The town was segregated. They may have been poor but my grandmother looks amazingly beautiful and confident in this photo.Submitted by Dagny Villegas (Indianapolis, IN). 

ofanotherfashion:

This is my grandmother, Dominga Villegas (in the foreground) and “Mama Piedad” (in the background). I am not sure how/if they’re related. One of the houses behind them is the home that my father was born in, in Weslaco Texas. There was no running water, no electricity and they had a pump and an outhouse in the backyard. According to my father, the street was a dirt road back then and the Mexicans lived on one side of town and white people lived on the other side. The town was segregated. They may have been poor but my grandmother looks amazingly beautiful and confident in this photo.

Submitted by Dagny Villegas (Indianapolis, IN). 

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

United Farm Workers co-founder Dolores Huerta received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama today. Said the president, ”Dolores was very gracious when I told her I had stolen her slogan, Si, se puede. Yes, we can. Knowing her, I’m pleased that she let me off easy— because Dolores does not play.”

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

United Farm Workers co-founder Dolores Huerta received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama today. Said the president, ”Dolores was very gracious when I told her I had stolen her slogan, Si, se puede. Yes, we can. Knowing her, I’m pleased that she let me off easy— because Dolores does not play.”

Women’s History Month: A Mexican artist’s tribute to Aztec deities, Latin-American heroines, and the victims of Juarez

isaia:

univisionnews:



Arroyo’s “Femenina” exhibit opens Friday and will run through April 27, at The Halls at Bowling Green, City College of New York. (Source: Andrea Arroyo)

By ARTURO CONDE
Channel: Culture, Art 

Women have lived in the minds of men for a long time. Robert Browning described a woman’s beauty as desirable and inaccessible like a thorny rose. Rainer Maria Rilke compared the face of a woman dancer to a sulfur match that flickers and fans out until it is consumed by fire. Both Homer and Ovid praised the lives of great men, but they needed to invoke the wit and charm of powerful women muses to tell their epics.

Read More

oh man, this one is particularly powerful to see from the context of

“Women losing their identity when they become victims”:

(Source: thisisfusion)

Women's History Month - María Rebecca Latigo de Hernández

selfrescuingprincesssociety:

Civil rights activist in San Antonio. Texas.

María Rebecca Latigo de Hernández was born in 1896 in Garza García, outside of Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexicon. Her father was a professor. This leads me to believe that education was important to her family, and even though she was a girl, her parents still encouraged her to learn.

She taught elementary school in Monterrey, Mexico. It’s likely that she immigrated to Texas as part of the flood of people leaving Mexico during the chaos of the Mexican Revolution.
In 1915, she married Pedro Hernandez Barrera in Hebbronville, Texas. The family moved to San Antonio in 1918, where they opened a grocery store and bakery, and set about raising their family, which eventually grew to ten children.
They were quite active in their community, and eventually became politically active. In 1929, they helped found the Orden Caballeros de América (the Order of Knights of America), an organization dedicated to civic and political activities to benefit Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants, especially in educational matters. While the organization primarily benefited male business owners of the Mexican American community, its educational goals likely benefited schooled aged children of both sexes. 
In 1933, María Hernández helped organize the Asociación Protectora de Madres, which provided assistance to expectant mothers.
In 1934 the Hernándezes helped organize La Liga de Defensa Pro-Escolar, an organization dedicated to obtaining better facilities and better education for the West Side Mexican community.

In 1932 María became San Antonio’s first Mexican female radio announcer, and in 1934, she spoke on the “Voz de las Americas” program to promote Council 16 of the League of United Latin American Citizens, organized to promote equality for Mexican Americans in all spheres of life. She was the only female speaker at the first meeting in 1934. The league was officially organized in December 1934, and she supported its efforts until 1940 and again in 1947, when it was reorganized. 
In 1938 she took up the cause of women workers’ rights in the Pecan-Shellers’ Strike when they stopped working to demand better pay and better working conditions. 
In 1939, she was part of a group of women to visit Mexican president Lázaro Cárdenas to express good will between Mexico and the Mexicans in the United States.
In 1945 she published her essay “México y Los Cuatro Poderes Que Dirigén al Pueblo,” in which she asserted that the domestic sphere was the foundation of society and mothers were the authority figures who molded nations. Around this same time, she organized Club Liberal Pro-Cultura de la Mujer, to build on those ideas.
Over the years, she made hundreds of speeches to promote equality for the Mexican community. In 1968 she appeared regularly on television in San Antonio to speak about education and social progress, on a program sponsored by El Círculo Social Damas de América. In December of that year, she and her husband were invited to testify at the San Antonio hearing before the United States Commission on Civil Rights, where they argued for changes in education to reform the embarrassing inaccurate portrayals of Mexican Americans and other minorities.
In 1969 she was elected to the positions of treasurer of the order’s board of directors and president of Círculo Social. At the order’s fortieth anniversary she gave the keynote address. In 1970, continuing to grow her political activism, she became joined the Raza Unida party and in July of that year served as a keynote speaker at its statewide conference in Austin. In 1972 she and her husband toured South and Central Texas in support of the party’s gubernatorial candidate Ramsey Muñiz and State Board of Education candidate Marta Cotera. Clearly, she had become an important voice for Mexican Americans in her community, and around the entire state of Texas.
María Hernández died of pneumonia on January 8, 1986, and was buried in the plot of the Orden Caballeros de América outside of Elmendorf, a symbol of the respect and prestige she had earned through her life’s work.