denverpost:

Buffalo Bill performer reburied at South Dakota reservation
The remains of a man who died young while touring the world with Buffalo Bill were hidden for more than a century in an unmarked grave some 1,700 miles from his South Dakota Indian reservation.
Now Albert Afraid of Hawk is returning home. He’ll be reburied Sunday in accordance with Lakota tradition, thanks largely to Bob Young, a curious and persistent Connecticut history buff.
Young uncovered records of the Oglala Sioux member’s death at a Connecticut hospital after a bout with food poisoning from eating bad corn. A few years ago, Young pieced the details together and reached out to Afraid of Hawk’s family members.
Afraid of Hawk began traveling with Buffalo Bill’s world-famous troupe known as the Congress of Rough Riders of the World two years before he died at age 20. He was among a rotating cast that helped educate and entertain thousands of spectators eager to hear firsthand accounts of life on the unruly terrain.

denverpost:

Buffalo Bill performer reburied at South Dakota reservation

The remains of a man who died young while touring the world with Buffalo Bill were hidden for more than a century in an unmarked grave some 1,700 miles from his South Dakota Indian reservation.

Now Albert Afraid of Hawk is returning home. He’ll be reburied Sunday in accordance with Lakota tradition, thanks largely to Bob Young, a curious and persistent Connecticut history buff.

Young uncovered records of the Oglala Sioux member’s death at a Connecticut hospital after a bout with food poisoning from eating bad corn. A few years ago, Young pieced the details together and reached out to Afraid of Hawk’s family members.

Afraid of Hawk began traveling with Buffalo Bill’s world-famous troupe known as the Congress of Rough Riders of the World two years before he died at age 20. He was among a rotating cast that helped educate and entertain thousands of spectators eager to hear firsthand accounts of life on the unruly terrain.

According to the 1940 Census there were no Latinos

nbclatino:

The 1940 census was officially released today. (Photo/Getty Images) 

While you might have listed yourself as “Puerto Rican,” or “Mexican,” or “Hispanic,” in the 2010 census, this is not how you are going to find your bisabuela or your abuela if she was in the U.S. and counted in the newly released records of the 1940 census. 

“The terms “Hispanic” or “Latino” were not used then,” says Mark Hugo López, of the Pew Hispanic Center. It was not until the 1970 census that Hispanics could identify themselves as such. 

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koreamjournal:

20th Anniversary of Los Angeles Riots ObservedUCR Today

The 1992 Los Angeles riots fundamentally changed how Korean Americans view themselves and their role in local politics and multiethnic, multiracial coalitions. Scholars and community activists will examine the social, political and cultural implications of the riots in a daylong conference on April 28. The event commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Los Angeles Civil Unrest.
The conference, “Confronting Sa-I-Gu: 20 Years After Koreatown Burned,” will begin at 9 a.m. at the Garden Suites Hotel in Koreatown, 681 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles. Sa-I-Gu means “4-29” and refers to the day that rioting began. Registration is $20. Student registration is $10. Contact Carol Park at carol.park@ucr.edu to register for the event.

koreamjournal:

20th Anniversary of Los Angeles Riots Observed
UCR Today

The 1992 Los Angeles riots fundamentally changed how Korean Americans view themselves and their role in local politics and multiethnic, multiracial coalitions. Scholars and community activists will examine the social, political and cultural implications of the riots in a daylong conference on April 28. The event commemorates the 20th anniversary of the Los Angeles Civil Unrest.

The conference, “Confronting Sa-I-Gu: 20 Years After Koreatown Burned,” will begin at 9 a.m. at the Garden Suites Hotel in Koreatown, 681 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles. Sa-I-Gu means “4-29” and refers to the day that rioting began. Registration is $20. Student registration is $10. Contact Carol Park at carol.park@ucr.edu to register for the event.