mypubliclands:

November is Native American Heritage Month. And this photo comes from Table Rocks in the Rogue River Valley where people are estimated to have lived for at least 15,000 years. The Takelma Indians (pronounced “Dagelma”) lived along the middle and upper Rogue River, including the Table Rocks area. To learn more about those who lived here thousands of years ago, check out more of their story online at: http://on.doi.gov/YKxRfN

mypubliclands:

November is Native American Heritage Month. And this photo comes from Table Rocks in the Rogue River Valley where people are estimated to have lived for at least 15,000 years.

The Takelma Indians (pronounced “Dagelma”) lived along the middle and upper Rogue River, including the Table Rocks area.

To learn more about those who lived here thousands of years ago, check out more of their story online at: http://on.doi.gov/YKxRfN

blackhistoryalbum:

The Way It Was……Mobile, Alabama, 1956. Series 4/5
“By Any Means Necessary”…..An African American teen, with his siblings in the background, standing guard with a gun during racial violence in Alabama,1956. Gordon Parks, Photographer.

blackhistoryalbum:

The Way It Was……Mobile, Alabama, 1956. Series 4/5

“By Any Means Necessary”…..An African American teen, with his siblings in the background, standing guard with a gun during racial violence in Alabama,1956. Gordon Parks, Photographer.

brya-she-rock:

thealphagirl:


This is an old photograph of a young African American girl posing in a photo booth sometime during the 1930’s. Written above her in faded ink is “Mozella.” There is nothing to indicate where this photograph was taken.

 i love things like this. I wonder who she was/where she was from/what led her go the photo booth

HER FACE IS EVERYTHING!

brya-she-rock:

thealphagirl:

This is an old photograph of a young African American girl posing in a photo booth sometime during the 1930’s. Written above her in faded ink is “Mozella.” There is nothing to indicate where this photograph was taken.

 i love things like this. I wonder who she was/where she was from/what led her go the photo booth

HER FACE IS EVERYTHING!

collective-history:

USA. 1963. Black man being forced aside by police.
Leonard Freed 

collective-history:

USA. 1963. Black man being forced aside by police.

Leonard Freed 

auntada:

Press conference, 10 February 1958. Dorothy L. Height (national president of National Council of Negro Women)
Photographer: Snow
University of Southern California, Los Angeles Examiner Collection

auntada:

Press conference, 10 February 1958. Dorothy L. Height (national president of National Council of Negro Women)

Photographer: Snow

University of Southern California, Los Angeles Examiner Collection

auntada:

African American woman being carried to police patrol wagon during demonstration in Brooklyn, New York] / World Telegram & Sun photo by Dick DeMarsico.
1963
New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

auntada:

African American woman being carried to police patrol wagon during demonstration in Brooklyn, New York] / World Telegram & Sun photo by Dick DeMarsico.

1963

New York World-Telegram and the Sun Newspaper Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

collective-history:

Yup’ik shaman exorcising evil spirits from a sick boy.
LOC Frank and Fraces Carpenter Collection

collective-history:

Yup’ik shaman exorcising evil spirits from a sick boy.

LOC Frank and Fraces Carpenter Collection

thesmithian:


Ever since Washington was carved from two slaveholding states in 1791, it has been a special place for black Americans. Lincoln freed the slaves in Washington about nine months before the Emancipation Proclamation, prompting blacks from the region to flock here. It was the birthplace of Duke Ellington and home to other artists like Zora Neale Hurston and Sterling Allen Brown, who later fueled the Harlem Renaissance. By 1957, blacks had become the majority of the city’s residents, exceeding numbers in any major city in the United States. Ever since Walter E. Washington was appointed mayor by Lyndon B. Johnson in 1967, the city has been led by black politicians and shaped by black institutions. This has fostered a sense of black privilege, swagger and, yes, the hubris that comes with leadership.

more.

thesmithian:

Ever since Washington was carved from two slaveholding states in 1791, it has been a special place for black Americans. Lincoln freed the slaves in Washington about nine months before the Emancipation Proclamation, prompting blacks from the region to flock here. It was the birthplace of Duke Ellington and home to other artists like Zora Neale Hurston and Sterling Allen Brown, who later fueled the Harlem Renaissance. By 1957, blacks had become the majority of the city’s residents, exceeding numbers in any major city in the United States. Ever since Walter E. Washington was appointed mayor by Lyndon B. Johnson in 1967, the city has been led by black politicians and shaped by black institutions. This has fostered a sense of black privilege, swagger and, yes, the hubris that comes with leadership.

more.